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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington. when there are rules, they get changed to any argument you like. you can hire an economist to say what you like. >> they are the worst. >> all you are doing is arguing over the 20% in the middle. >> this is an amazing vision of politi politics. one politician, one economist, it's true. it's absolutely true. any argument, you can get a politician, economist and 40 people. >>> as long as you have a party label. >> exactly. >> then it enters, once you get to 40 and 40, it enters a round where it's debated as if reality is debated. it's not what has been debated in this country for a long time. there are no hard and fast rules that apply. it is the political argument that wins the day, one way or the other. >> taxes are political, right? >> i want to follow up on what the governor was saying. he was given an example and highlighted. we have been talking about fiction, about well, okay, if we cut taxes, the economy gets better. then the fake argument is spend, spend, spend. in reality, as we are seeing it out, it's a mixture of both. we have to do smart investments, bringing in revenue
later in the program interviewing dan savage. it's about dan's marriage in washington state. they are one of the couples getting married there. after voters extended marriage rights to same-sex couples by popular vote last month. we have david johnston, the author of "fine print." he's a pulitzer prize winning tax writer at new york times and now at the college of law. we have the president and ceo of the center of american progress who served in the obama and clinton administrations, policy director of hillary clinton's campaign. laura flanders, founder of grittv.com. the editor of salon.com and the woman who hired me two years ago. thanks, as always for that. >> of course. >> anyway, on friday afternoon, house speaker john boehner attempted to paint a picture of white house negotiations and how to avoid going over the fiscal curve. i have been saying fiscal slope. now on the show, i'll go with curve. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony from president clinton's former chief of
conference in washington, d.c. we'll have more on the nra in just a moment. right now i'm joined by tom kotz, kaley elkins, rich lucivella of "s.w.a.t." magazine, and jackie kellens. thank you for being here. they promised, quote, meaningful contributions to stop gun violence but in a press conference in which the organization took no questions, the executive vice president and ceo wayne lapier's only contribution was his call for armed guards inside all of the nation's schools. >> i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. and to do it now to make sure that blanket safety is in place when our kids return to school in january. >> for 30 minutes lapierre went on a tread that was steadfast, unyielded and trying to blame violence on the insane monster that is pop late our society. but it turned into a glimpse inside the mind of the man who makes the nra, the lobbying arm of the firearms industry, tick. it was easily the most riveting, chilling and revealing spectacle that i have witnessed.
it is one or both of those things. >> let's bring in the congressional reporter for the washington post. are we looking at the real possibility that these negotiations will be passed on to the next congress? >> well, we are certainly getting closer and there is still time to go. the fact that mitch mcconnell and joe biden are now leading these talks is actually somewhat encouraging because these two have cut deals before. they have served together for quite a while in the senate. they were part of the debt ceiling negotiations last year and it was believed that mitch mcconnell would be brought in to these negotiations. the fact that they are still talking and on capitol hill yesterday and here today and remains hopeful that something can come suggests they are eager to cut some kind of a deal. we will have to wait and see whether or not it is conceivable by the end of the day. >> you wrote an article titled "the fiscal cliff is just an early battle in a war that democrats are going to win" where do you think republicans went wrong? >> well, you know, the problem for republicans i think
by jamelle buoy. a staff writer for the american prospect magazine and "washington post" reporter, suzy kim. kevin williamson, dep deputy mag editor and a nonprofit group that advocates for social and economic equality. we're one day away from what most media are calling the fiscal cliff. if political concoction enacted by congress to frighten itself into passing deficit reduction measures which means unless congress acts in the next 48 hours the bush tax cuts will expire along with federal unemployment insurance and a broad package of the spending cuts including defense spending will take effect. do weeks of fruitless negotiations and john boehner and senate leader are working on a deal this morning to avoid the fiscal cliff, or as chris hayes and i call it, the fiscal curve. the deadline is soft. it's not like every american is going to be handed a bill on january 1st and there's way to manage the damage if the country goes over. the senate is set to convene this afternoon with the house to follow tonight. there's a chance that a compromise will be reached, less than 48 hours before tax r
and text. get a spectrum 2 by lg for $49.99 >> it's a hazy winter day new washington, d.c., hard to see how congressional leaders will work it out in the next fraetd hours to keep the country from falling off the so-called fiscal cliff. i'm craig melvin and you are watching msnbc, with all the focus on the fiscal cliff, will there be action on gun control. meanwhile, we are going to talk to an attorney general that wants to arm teachers to protect students. and the race to fill john kerry's senate seat. first, fiscal cliff talks. countdown clock tot screen. the senate is shouldering most of the weight of that deadline. senate leaders working behind closed doors to come up with a cliff compromise, something that the house and the president has failed to do so is far. the president has tasked senator majority leader harry reed. >> i have asked senator reed to do it, put a by on the floor to make sure that taxes on middle class families do not go up. and unemployment insurance is still available for two million people and lays the groundwork for economic growth and deficit reduction. >> everyt
of closed car door talks lawmakers in washington left town for the holidays on friday without an agreement to avert what we're calling the fiscal curb. a series of automatic tax increases and spending cuts to take affect a week from now. a moment this week, the two sides seemed on the cusp of a deal. that would have involved at least one major concession from president obama. to cut social security benefits. the cuts wouldn't have been direct. they would have come from a tweak to the way the social security benefits are calculated. here's how it works. right now the amount of money a retireee gets from the government gets is changed due to the index. when inflakes goes up, social security recipients see their payments go up the same amount to keep up with the cost of living. obama proposes switching to "chained cpi. "the name is opaque but the name is simple. the chained cpi rises more slow lie than regular cpi. if you yoois chain cpi to calculate social security benefits the amounts of the social security checks will rise more slowly, as well, against inflation. for about two days, this m
right now in washington, and i was cheered to see the president's opening bid, but the consensus in washington is that we have to come up with a grand bargain, dot dot dot we have to do something with entitlements. this is the big thing. something about entitlements. i just don't understand why that's the case. the reason i don't understand why that's the case is the big problem is the rate of growth of health care costs. i think we can all agree on that, right? >> yes. >> now medicare -- the rate of growth in medicare is significantly lower than the rate of growth of health care costs in the private sector. it's doing a better job of controlling cost relative to the private sector. then we just passed a huge bill that was incredibly contentious, which is called the affordable care act. the vast majority of the legislative language of which is about controlling costs in health care over the future. so it seems to me like the reasonable thing to do is to wait four years, five years, implement the bill and see if the cost control measures that have been put it in place, fought abou
it would rise, the policy conclusions that people come to, washington would now be on fire with policy discussions. with official policy discussions about -- and no one would say don't politicize the tragedy of someone named abdullah mutallab walking into a school. >> that's what honors the children and the mother of adam lanza who was killed. right before the first presidential debate, i went to virginia tech. colin goddard, one of the victims, one of the 33 who didn't die but has three bullets in him you today. took me through the place where he was shot up and where his teachers were killed at virginia tech. i was with him because the next day, president obama and mitt romney would be holding their first debate at the university of denver, and he was leading the campaign, to get the moderator, jim lehrer, the pbs host, to ask the question about gun violence. after all, the debate was taking place in colorado. you had oaurora about that. tens of thousands of signatures, was a question asked? no. >> and basically both candidates did everything they could to not address guns. it was li
at issues like this and we can't come together as a nation, we need to check who we're sending to washington. wore who we ought to be bringing home. issues like this ought to be just straight forward. there are great organizations out there and one is men stopping violence, who go to re-educate communities, retrain men who have been on the aggressive side of these issues and women, too. according to statistics. but to say that we don't have the political will as a country, to step forward and protect the least of these, women who have been hit, locked in, beaten, stabbed, shot -- we can't do anything about that? >> peter, you were a police officer in baltimore and one of the things that's always struck me when i've been reporting and i've talked to cops, is how much of being a police officer, a beat cop, is domestic violence calls? >> it might even be the majority of what you do as a police officer. >> it's a outside of clearing drug dealers offcorners it's a huge part. usually when cops show up there's been a fight and basically, cops arrest the winner. it's sort of a law of unintended cons
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)